The Robin Hood Stories

The Ghosts of Sherwood by Carrie Vaughn

Publication Date: June 9, 2020

Summary from Goodreads:

Everything about Father is stories.

Robin of Locksley and his one true love, Marian, are married. It has been close on two decades since they beat the Sheriff of Nottingham with the help of a diverse band of talented friends. King John is now on the throne, and Robin has sworn fealty in order to further protect not just his family, but those of the lords and barons who look up to him – and, by extension, the villagers they protect.

There is a truce. An uneasy one, to be sure, but a truce, nonetheless.

But when the Locksley children are stolen away by persons unknown, Robin and Marian are going to need the help of everyone they’ve ever known, perhaps even the ghosts that are said to reside deep within Sherwood.

And the Locksley children, despite appearances to the contrary, are not without tricks of their own…

Confession:

I thought that this was a full length novel when I checked it out of the library, so I was surprised that it was only a novella. It certainly had the potential to be fleshed out into something full length. It was really good and a fast read and I just adored Robin’s children.

The oldest Mary is in her mid teens and is quite the smart and spunky young lady. She can handle a bow and shoots just as well if not better than her father. John is the middle child and is very sweet, but also can hold his own in a fight. Eleanor is the youngest and while she is mute, you can tell that she is just as smart and as courageous as her siblings.

It was such fun to see Robin and Marion as parents and as the legends that they have become. Many of the merry men are around as well which was fun to see.

The story was well done with nice pacing and some great character development for such a short story. I loved how each child held their own during the kidnapping and how they worked together to get themselves free.

The Heirs of Locksley by Carrie Vaughn

Publication Date: August 4, 2020

Summary from NetGalley:

“We will hold an archery contest. A simple affair, all in fun, on the tournament grounds. Tomorrow. We will see you there.”

The latest civil war in England has come and gone, King John is dead, and the nobility of England gathers to see the coronation of his son, thirteen year old King Henry III.

The new king is at the center of political rivalries and power struggles, but John of Locksley—son of the legendary Robin Hood and Lady Marian—only sees a lonely boy in need of friends. John and his sisters succeed in befriending Henry, while also inadvertently uncovering a political plot, saving a man’s life, and carrying out daring escapes.

All in a day’s work for the Locksley children…

ARC provided by MacMillan-Tor/Forge via NetGalley for an honest review.

Confession:

This is more of a short story than a novella, but it was just as much fun as the first story. Again I would just love to see this fleshed out into a full story. It is very well done and I really like the characters and the story.

This story skips ahead about 5 years. King John is dead and his eleven year old son is taking the throne. The Locksley’s are in London for the coronation and things get somewhat difficult for all when John and the young King stumble on a conspiracy in the making. I enjoyed the budding relationship John and Henry, such a great beginning to a solid friendship.

The archery contest was also great. I really liked the fact that Marion and Robin did not attend but allowed for their children to go and start their own legends.

A really well crafted story and re-imaging of the Robin Hood legends and how his life played out. I hope to see more stories about Robin and his children.

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.